image/svg+xml Overview: A semi-detailed look at the lesson planning process. To start, enter tutor name and password, then click "login". The lesson planner will contact the server and build the necessary planning pages. Select the student for this lesson from a dropdown menu of the tutor's current students. Click "Select concepts". The system will select concepts for the lesson by examining the student's knowledge module, as well as the appropriate scope and sequence. The selection algorithm ensures that less well-known concepts are selected more frequently than better known concepts. You can modify the selection or accept the planner's proposal. Click "Plan lesson with selected concepts". Overview: How the planner helps you manage word selection. Word selection process: The system will present a list of selectable words at the bottom of the screen. To select a word for this segment, click it at the bottom. The selected word will appear at the top of the screen, color coded to indicate for which lesson segment it was used. This helps us avoid repeating the same word between lesson segments. It also allows us to visually check if words are distributed evenly between concepts. It is usually best to select words for the text and sentence segments first, then choose single-word-read and single-word-spell words from among the leftovers. Starting with the "text spell" lesson segment. Suggested texts are shown in the top panel, ordered from best to worst. Targeted words are shown in green, words which the student model says the student might not be able to read are in red. In the top sentence, "his" is red because the student hasn't covered "s" says |z| yet, and "the" is red because the student hasn't covered stressed "th". However, these are both high frequency words which we can probably let slide (of course, for any particular student we might not). "Would" is a problem, so we will edit the sentence to improve it. We will change "would" to "will" and "got" to "gets". Double click on the word, and it appears in its own edit box. Change it to something the student can decode and click "save story". In this case, the save fails because "gets" is not in the lexicon. The lexicon currently contains over 95,000 words, but some of these words still lack inflected forms. The parse editor makes it easy to add these forms. The parse editor has two panes, allowing you to look at two-word parses at the same time. Editing parses simply involves copying a feature from one word to another. In this case we search for "get" in the top pane, and "sam" in the bottom pane. We make sure "S" is making the correct sound, then transfer it to the end of "get" in the top pane. In this case we search for "get" in the top pane, and "sam" in the bottom pane. We make sure "S" is making the correct sound, then transfer it to the end of "get" in the top pane. In this case, the save fails because "gets" is not in the lexicon. The lexicon currently contains over 95,000 words, but some of these words still lack inflected forms. The parse editor makes it easy to add these forms. Returning to the text-spell plan, we can now successfully save the modified sentence. Entirely new sentences are easy to write. Simply scan the suggested words in the bottom pane and write a sentence that uses some from each column. Note that every sentence and word added to the system becomes available for other tutors to use (and improve) in their own lessons. The lexicon gets better and better over time!